Why I Started Blogging: Thoughts After One Year of Being “A Blogger”

Digital Dilemma

Heather Clark Headshot

I’m happy to share that Lost Online is officially one year old! Today I’m delighted because if I’m being completely honest, this is the longest I’ve ever kept a personal project going — just for the fun of it. Since I started this blog it’s been one of the best decisions I’ve made. I feel like I’ve come into my own over the past year by creating this. Even though this website is read by few, it means so much to me. In honor of it being officially a one year old, I wanted to share the top ten reasons why I decided to start blogging in hopes it will inspire someone else to start their own personal blog!

Before Lost Online

I always knew that I wanted to have my own blog and I actually tried and failed several times over the course of five years. I had this crazy idea in my head that if I wanted to be a blogger, I had to do what all of the other female bloggers I read were doing: write about fashion and beauty or about travel. I also thought that if I was going to have my own blog that I had to be successful. Very successful. That this little platform of my own had to make enough money to support me and end up pulling in a six-figure salary someday. I didn’t realize that I could just do it for fun, I thought that if I had a blog I have to do it for work.

I got myself all worked up about what it had to be like and then I would dive into the world of blogging only to be left disappointed and confused. I didn’t know anything about SEO or earning money online, and I thought that if I were to be a blogger I had to have it all figured out. On top of that, I was so terrified of someone that I knew reading my blog and being judgmental about it. I would always hide my blogs and keep them a secret, or make sure that friends and family couldn’t accidentally find it. Not surprisingly, the motivation and inspiration that I had to start blogging would be crushed and I’d delete the website.

Eventually, after five years of making and deleting blogs, a series of events finally pushed me to stop being a chicken and actually go for it. I let go of all expectations and built this platform for me, just because I wanted to. Today, I’m not making money from my blog, I’m not a “professional blogger,” and I’m not suggesting that I have it all figured out. I’m just a girl who’s been writing for a whole year who is stupid passionate about it. This is my own experience with blogging and why I find it fulfilling.

1. It’s a portfolio

When I was in my Junior year of college at Flagler, I had a digital media teacher who I absolutely loved. She was one of those rare professors I had who was actually passionate about the subject matter and really wanted to help her students flourish. Her name was Mrs. Hill and almost every class period she would talk about why it’s so beneficial to have a blog. Mrs. Hill preached about how being in communications today, it’s helpful (and almost expected) that college graduates have a blog. In a blog, you can really show off to employers your talents, passions, and personal voice. So in the end, it can set you apart from other people who are applying for the same job.

Mrs. Hill also shared that having a blog shows that you’re the type of person who is dedicated and hardworking. That during your weeknights and weekends, you sit down and write articles just because you feel compelled to. The fact that every month you come back and continue to sit in the chair, write, and post articles for employers to read, shows a lot about what kind of worker you are.

Now, I’m not sharing this to sound like a career coach or a college professor, but those words were one of the key factors that lead me to create Lost Online. I wanted to do it for personal reasons and for creative reasons, but hearing Mrs. Hill talk about how writing a blog showed initiative was like getting a permission slip to follow a dream. Telling myself and others that I was doing it to make myself “hirable” made it acceptable and less scary.

2. Self-expression

For many years I felt that I needed a way to express myself creatively. I would see people who had ways of expressing themselves through pottery, poetry, designing homes, or anything else and I’d think about how desperately I wanted something like that of my own. I wanted some hobby that felt natural to me that I loved. So I decided to start blogging. But even then, when I started Lost Online, I didn’t realize how good it would feel. I didn’t know how natural it would feel to brainstorm ideas for blogs and write lengthy posts. I thought that after the initial excitement went away that it was going to feel like homework. Far from it.

It gave me a voice to talk about what I was interested in. I literally got to sit in a chair and ramble on my computer about digital media for my own entertainment. And although I have little to no followers on the blog, it still gave me a voice and an opportunity to share my ideas in a concrete way. Not just over a glass of wine with friends. Blogging helped me express my views to anyone who was willing to read and helped me figure myself out along the way.

3. It strengthens self-discipline

As much as I love to create new posts for Lost Online, I still go through spells where I’m feeling less than motivated or too busy to get back to writing. But I know that I have to. I care about what I create on here and I want to continue to see my content evolve and get better… for all 24 of my followers, lol. And now that I’m so attached to Lost Online, there’s no way that I could let it go. Which means that sometimes, even when I’m not feeling up to it, I have to make myself sit down and get to work. I have to knock out a few paragraphs or finally post a blog that’s been ready for a few days. I even have to go out of my way to take a photo for a specific post that I have coming up.

It’s taught me self-discipline that I didn’t have before. Sure, I was disciplined in school and work, but never with my own projects. I could get things done for a professor or for an employer with no problem, but I couldn’t do it for myself. Writing for Lost Online taught me that if something is important to me, I have to work, even if I’m not feeling motivated. I have to get my butt in the chair and do the work because no one is going to come to my rescue to do it for me or suddenly bestow upon me the gift of motivation.

4. Blogging makes people interesting

I always felt that people who blogged were interesting. Maybe because I felt like they were so sophisticated because they spend their free time writing that it meant they must have a rich inner life. They have so many wonderful ideas bursting out of them that they have to share it with the world. Right? That’s how I view other bloggers, but not how I see myself.

However, what I didn’t expect out of my personal experience, was how interested people would be when I tell them that I blog. When people ask me about my hobbies and interests and I tell them that I have a blog, their ears perk up. People become naturally curious about what I write about. I proudly tell them that Lost Online is about “how we stay sane during a time when we live half of our lives online,” (my own quote that I share anytime someone gives me the chance). And what I’ve noticed is that it always ends up leading to a meaningful conversation about digital media and how growing up online impacted them personally. This platform has lead to many interesting conversations which continue to expand my perspective.

An extra bonus is that employers that I network with or interview for are especially interested when they know that I write a blog. I’m assuming that it’s for the same reasons that Mrs. Hill always talked about. It shows that I’m motivated and hard-working.

5. A sense of accomplishment

Speaking of being hard-working and motivated. Another benefit of blogging that I’ve noticed was the lovely sense of accomplishment. It brings me so much satisfaction to sit down at my desk or at a coffee shop and see the words appear on the document. It brings even more satisfaction once I’ve finally edited it and hit that little green “Publish” button and watch it appear for the first time on my website. Every time I publish a post I can’t help but smile and think “I did that. I sat my a** down in my chair and worked on a post for hours and now it’s published.” No one made me do it. There was no deadline or obligation. I worked on an article for the pure joy of it, and now it’s finished.

It’s sort of like the feeling of finishing a book only 20 times better. And it’s not quite like finishing a paper for work or for school because I did it for myself and I put all of my creativity and my energy into it. You know that feeling! That feeling when you finishing a piece of art and can’t help but smile because of how happy and content you are that you made it. You did it solely for yourself and saw it through until the end. It’s that feeling of accomplishment.

6. It’s mine, no one else’s

Having a blog of my own means that I have my own space. It’s my own project. My own platform. I don’t have a boss, a partner, or a professor saying “No you can’t do that, change it.” No one could tell me that the picture I chose isn’t the best fit for my post, or my ending wasn’t satisfactory, or that it’s B average and could “use some work.”

I could ramble about whatever the hell I want to today and it doesn’t matter because there’s no one to police me. Nobody could tell me how to run this blog, because it’s mine. They can have opinions, yes, but they don’t have the power to make me change what I’m doing here. We spend our lives running around doing things for other people and trying to please our family, our co-workers, our partners, and our friends, but in a personal blog, you don’t have to! There’s something oddly empowering about it.

7. I was envious of bloggers

There’s a quote that I love by Susan Cain, who wrote the book “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking.” Cain said, “Pay attention to what you envy. Jealousy is an ugly emotion, but it tells the truth. You mostly envy those who have what you desire.” I always wanted to have my own blog, but the moment that I knew exactly how badly I wanted a blog was when another girl that I know (who I envied for other reasons) started her own blog and was excitedly promoting it on social media. I clicked on her blog and discovered that she was actually doing a great job and was writing posts that were interesting and engaging. She wasn’t making money from it, but she was a girl my age that I already compared myself to, who decided to pursue blogging.

I cannot describe the ridiculous amount of jealousy and green-eyed ugliness that washed over me when I first saw she started a blog. I’m ashamed to admit that some girl starting a personal blog was enough to put me in a tizzy, but it did. And that’s when I realized that clearly I really cared about this. That it’s a hard sign that I want to seriously pursue blogging. Even if no one looks at it but me, I would still feel compelled to do it, and it would always bother me if I didn’t at least try.

8. Self-discovery

I had been starting and deleting blogs for years and would always end up stopping after about two posts into it. I think it was because I had no idea what I really wanted to write about. So I wrote about random things that fit into beauty, lifestyle, and travel even though I wasn’t wanting to write those pieces. So before I even started Lost Online, I asked myself “What is one thing that I’m so interested in that I could write about it for a year straight and never get bored?” Instantly, I knew that it was digital media and the way that it had affected me in high school and college. I opened up a note on my phone and typed out all of my ideas for 24 hours, and within that time I had come up with my plan, my content ideas, my name, my tagline, and my philosophy. I spent the next week locked away in my room building the site and working on my first posts.

After 12 months of working on it though, I continue to have moments like that when I ask myself what I want to write about and I’m often surprised by my answer. Sometimes I don’t realize how interested I am in a topic until I’ve begun working on a post about it. For example, I didn’t realize how interested I was in the topics of self-help and self-love, and lately, those have been the posts that excite me the most. It’s been a wonderful way to explore topics that I’m very interested in and dive deeper into the subjects. Many of those posts haven’t even made it onto the website yet, but I still continue to learn and grow from them regardless.

9. Everyone’s doing it

The first six months or more of having a blog, I was so nervous about sharing it. Like actually scared of what would happen if people found it. I wanted to basically have a secret blog for internet followers but didn’t want friends and family to know. If you’ve read my blog about “How I Freed Myself From the Opinions of Others,” you’ll know why. But the more I continued to write in private, the more I discovered how so many of my friends online had blogs, and others would tell me how much they wanted to blog. Realizing just how popular blogging was becoming made me realize that it’s not a big deal. It seems that way when we first begin. It seems like a risk, it seems like a lot of work, and the nerves about what other people will think begin to settle in.

Blogs have been viewed in the past as a personal diary meant for sad people who want to vent to the world about their emotions. But it’s not like that anymore. Perceptions of blogs have shifted in the last few years and have become incredibly popular among online celebrities. Now it’s viewed as something only super successful people can do. But that’s not true at all. It’s not unusual to have a blog anymore, and it doesn’t matter what you want to write about. Everyone is doing it!

10. It makes me happy

Last, but certainly not least, blogging makes me happy. Simple as that. I enjoy every part of it. The brainstorming, the website creation, the writing, and reading the comments.

If you’re still here, I imagine it’s because you want to start a blog too (or because you know me personally and are super curious as to what the heck I’m doing and why I haven’t shared this with you). But if you do want to start a blog, I encourage you to find the courage, the motivation, the confidence — whatever you need — to do it. If it’s what makes you happy, nothing else matters. I wish I realized that before all of the other reasons listed above, but I didn’t. If you want to start a blog too, just do it already. And when you do please comment below what finally pushed you to start your own blog and share the link for me to see! 

Photographer: Autumn Clark.

6 thoughts on “Why I Started Blogging: Thoughts After One Year of Being “A Blogger”

  1. Love this Heather! I feel the same way, even though I’ve only been blogging for a few months. I feel like it’s a place I can let my creative juices flow and express myself. Keep writing! Xx

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  2. I began blogging after an early retirement forced me to find something (anything!) interesting and challenging that I could do from home. Writing was something I had dabbled in for fun but I never thought publishing my own stuff was even a possibility. This past July I looked into blogging, set up a webpage and never looked back. I love what I do, am inspired by other bloggers and have found a wonderful community of people just like myself! You can check it out on: https://nancymarieallen.com/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s so wonderful! I’m glad to hear that! It’s funny because it’s such a simple thing to do, but so often we complicate it and tell ourselves “I could never do that.” Once you get past that mindset it feels so good to see yourself stepping outside your comfort zone and doing something that you didn’t think you could before. Thanks for commenting! I’m going to your site now!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. I love this, all the setbacks and mishaps you said were just like me when I was trying to have it all figured out. Recently I decided to just go for it and stop trying to have expectations.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, I’m glad you enjoyed it! And congratuatlations! How is the blogging going now that you’ve decided to finally pursue it?

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